Simple English Wikipedia

Hacker News has a discussion about the Simple English Wikipedia, which uses easier vocabulary and less complex sentence constructions than the regular English Wikipedia. This is great for mid-level readers and this year I’m going to start directing students to use this version during research projects.

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Keyboard-Type Input

In a recent interview with the The Chronicle of Higher Education1, Bill Gates was asked how tablet computers can make a difference in education and responded:

Just giving people devices has a really horrible track record. You really have to change the curriculum and the teacher. And it’s never going to work on a device where you don’t have a keyboard-type input. Students aren’t there just to read things. They’re actually supposed to be able to write and communicate. And so it’s going to be more in the PC realm—it’s going to be a low-cost PC that lets them be highly interactive.

I agree with the first part of his statement because the curriculum and pedogy need to change to make any technology worthwhile. However, he is wrong about the need for keyboards. My middle school students have done complex work on our iPod Touches, such as creating documents that use desktop publishing skills involving typing, creating charts and inserting images. Due to Apple’s intuitive software design, students are quickly able to get past the lack of hardware keyboard. Moreover, they don’t necessarily see the lack of keyboard of as a limitation. Since a third of their lives have been dominated by touch devices, they don’t see keyboards as a prerequisite for using a computer.

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Technology and Standardized Tests in the New York Times

The New York Times published a lengthy, must-read article examining how investments in technology by school districts have not resulted in higher test scores. The article focuses on the Kyrene School District in Arizona, which has considerable investments in technology but stagnated test scores when compared to Arizona as a whole.

This finding doesn’t surprise me, but I also don’t think it is a problem. I have long thought that standardized tests focus on a very narrow range of skills, not including 21st century skills such as applying technology to solve problems. Thus, technology use in schools has great value beyond teaching just basic skills. The article addresses this as well, quoting Karen Cator, Director of the Office of Educational Technology:

“In places where we’ve had a large implementing of technology and scores are flat, I see that as great,” she said. “Test scores are the same, but look at all the other things students are doing: learning to use the Internet to research, learning to organize their work, learning to use professional writing tools, learning to collaborate with others.”

The article also explores other factors affecting student performance in fair detail, such as economic factors and the difficulty of doing long-term studies of student performance related to technology.

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Recommended Reading: How to Count

Image of the book cover for How to Count

The cover image for "How to Count". The hand is showing the number 28 in binary.

Steven Frank, the co-founder of Panic Software, creators of Transmit, my favorite ftp program, recently published an ebook titled How to Count: Programming for Mere Mortals, Vol. 1. I highly recommend buying a copy as unprotected pdf or epub for ¢299. While there are many introductory articles available for free that explain how to count in binary, this book quickly moves on to more advanced topics such as hexadecimal, signed integers and floats.

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Converting Flash Animations with Swiffy

Earlier in my teaching career, I experimented with using Flash to create animations for my students. Now that I’m an avid iOS user, I’ve given up on that platform. I have hours invested into projects that I can’t run on my phone or iPad, but fortunately Google has created a utility named Swiffy that will convert .swf files into html5 and javascript that will run in modern web browsers. Below are two projects I originally created in 2004 that I just converted using Swiffy.

Title screen of the Bering Land Bridge Theory animation

Click image to play the Bering Land Bridge Theory animation.

 

Title page for the Triangular Trade animation

Click image to play the interactive Triangular Trade animation.

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iPads in Kindergarten

The Seattle Times recently ran a story about a school in Maine that is supplying iPads in kindergarten classes. There is little mention about how they will be used other than references to “apps for phonics, building words, letter recognition and letter formation”. I hope they end up pushing the capabilities of the devices far beyond these uses.

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When Technology Gets Out of the Way…

I love this new iPad 2 commercial. From my experience with iPods in the classroom, getting technology out of the way increases time on educational tasks. My students don’t spend ten minutes watching the computers login, then another 30 seconds for an application to launch. Instead, they get right to work with a device that is barely noticeable in a room full of learning.

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Passing the Laura Ingalls Test

Writing for Slate.com, Linda Perlstein recently proposed the Laura Ingalls test. Imagine if this prairie girl were to time travel to the present day and consider how she would respond to modern-day technology. If you brought her to an Apple Store or handed her a cell phone, she wouldn’t know what to make of it. Yet, if you brought her to the nearest 5th grade classroom, she would immediately recognize it as a school, something nearly unchanged from her time. Perlstein then asks her readers to describe the ideal modern-day classroom. Their ideas are recorded as comments to her post.

Continue reading

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Labeling iPods

For our first day of winter vacation, my wife and I spent some time in my classroom bar-coding and labeling my iPods. We also labeled each slot in the cart.

That process went fairly quickly, but I also wanted to upgrade all of the iPods to iOS 4.2.1. That took much more time because I could only do one device at a time. However, by following these directions from Fraser Speirs on how to save the update file locally, I saved close to 10 minutes each device.

Photo of my iPods in the drawer of my Bretford Cart

Close-up photo of my drawer with labels.

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Email Demographics

Graph showing email usage by age group

From the New York Times; “E-Mail’s Big Demographic Split

Wow, email really is for old people.

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